Criminal Defense FAQs

Why Hire A Defense Lawyer?

When you are facing criminal charges, it is normal to think about representing yourself. After all, our culture tells us that if you just "tell it like it is," the judge and the prosecutor will understand and you will be fine.

Unfortunately, that is simply not true.

The criminal defense system comes with its own rules and logic. In fact, the rules and logic can shift depending on the location of the courtroom. Further, the rules and logic of the criminal defense system become particularly important if you need to protect your rights in the courtroom at trial. You do not need a technicality tripping you up and costing you your freedom.

Can explaining my situation help me avoid an arrest?

You have a right to remain silent for a reason. You do not understand which facts are legally significant or how a situation will be viewed by the police or, later, by the prosecutor and a judge.

So answer all the usual questions if you are stopped. Be cooperative. But you do not have to agree to have your car searched or answer questions not related to being stopped by the police.

What is the difference between misdemeanors and felonies?

Not all crimes are created equal. Felonies are more serious than misdemeanors. In Florida, felonies are punishable by more than one year in state prison and even death in some limited circumstances. Misdemeanors are punishable by less than a year of incarceration, typically in the county jail.

Are Breathalyzers always accurate?

Like all tests for sobriety, Breathalyzers are not always accurate. In fact, winning a challenge to a Breathalyzer test is not uncommon. Breathalyzers are often incorrectly maintained, incorrectly operated or administered by a person not qualified to do so.

Contact The Law Firm Now For A Free Consultation

If you are facing criminal charges, time is of the essence. Contact attorney Ian F. Mann today online or by telephone at 239-935-5935 or toll free at 866-416-1488. Our law office is conveniently located in downtown Fort Myers, just two blocks from the federal and state courthouses.